During the coming week, committees within the New Hampshire House will hold public hearings on numerous bills that could have positive impacts for liberty. Individuals who wish to share their opinions on these bills will have the opportunity to speak to the legislators on the committees during the hearings. Those who cannot attend the hearings may also submit their testimony to the committees online and they could email the committee members. 

In the Live Free or Die state, there are generally no restrictions for carrying any weapons. Granite Staters may legally carry pistols and rifles open or concealed. However, brass knuckles remain illegal to carry. House Bill 31 would eliminate the carrying of brass knuckles and similar self-defense tools from the list of crimes in the books. The House Criminal Justice & Public Safety Committee held a public hearing on 1/20 and will soon make a recommendation on the bill. The video can be viewed here. Emails in support of HB31 will reach every member of the committee and could make them more likely to recommend the full House pass the bill.

One of the few other areas of self-defense law that could be improved in New Hampshire is the prohibition of felons from carrying firearms. Currently, individuals convicted of felonies are not permitted to carry firearms. House Bill 144 would allow those convicted of non-violent crimes to enjoy their natural rights to self-defense and to own property such as firearms. The House Criminal Justice & Public Safety Committee held a public hearing on 1/20 and will soon make a recommendation on the bill. Emails in support of HB144 will reach every member of the committee and could make them more likely to recommend the full House pass the bill.

There appear to be two bills that would nullify federal gun laws proposed by freshmen libertarian legislators this session! Proposed by former US Marine Tom Mannion from Pelham, House Bill 474 would prohibit “the enforcement of any federal law or rule that might impair a person’s natural right to firearm ownership and natural right to self-defense and requires any public official who attempts to enforce such a federal law to be terminated from their position.” Jason Gerhard, a longtime liberty activist and freshmen Rep. from Northfield took another approach with House Bill 512. His bill “exempts firearms, firearms accessories, and ammunition manufactured in New Hampshire from interstate commerce and from regulation by the federal government.” Both bills will have public hearings in the House Criminal Justice & Public Safety Committee, though the date has not yet been posted.

While New Hampshire has made some reforms to their drug laws, including decriminalizing cannabis for personal use, the state still criminalizes many drugs. House Bill 216 would end the prohibition on dimethyltryptamine (DMT), a relatively safe psychoactive substance. The House Criminal Justice & Public Safety Committee held a hearing on 1/20 and will soon make a recommendation on the bill. Emails in support of HB216 will reach every member of the committee and could make them more likely to recommend the full House pass the bill. House Bill 328 would legalize the possession of LSD, Peyote, psilocybin, and mescaline for individuals ages 21 & older. The hearing for HB328 has not yet been scheduled by the CJ&PS Committee. House Bill 581 would simply repeal the state’s ‘controlled drug act’, which would sever ties to the federal drug laws and effectively end the war on drugs in New Hampshire.

In December 2020, Dictator Sununu directed his armed henchmen to punish peaceful protestors who were in his neighborhood. Further, he colluded with his brother – a member of the Board of Selectmen in his town – to make it a crime to peacefully protest near his home, essentially giving the middle finger to the first amendment. Sponsored by a constitutional attorney, House Bill 164 would prohibit towns from criminalizing the right to peacefully and orderly assemble. The House Judiciary Committee held a hearing on 1/20 and will soon make a recommendation on the bill. Emails in support of HB164 will reach every member of the committee and could make them more likely to recommend the full House pass the bill.

Considering that the right to self-governance is a natural right hardly disputed and considering that there is broad support for the people of Britain, Ukraine, and many other states to govern themselves, lawmakers felt that the New Hampshire legislature should officially condemn the use of violence against those who seek to govern themselves. Proposed by three pro-liberty lawmakers, House Resolution 6 simply reads:  

“Whereas, the right to self-governance is a natural human right and a critical facet of civilized society; now, therefore, be it Resolved by the House of Representatives, the Senate concurring:

No government is justified in the use of violence or any military action or any acts of war against any group of people who wish to govern themselves. Initiating violence against a group of people for seeking to govern themselves is condemned as barbaric, authoritarian, and antithetical to liberty.”

Any legislator who votes against this resolution essentially admits that they support the use of military force to murder those who seek independence (meaning that they literally would have opposed the American colonists and supported the British King in 1776). The House State-Federal Relations Committee is currently contemplating the HCR6.

Among the many reasons for the groundswell of support for New Hampshire independence is the rampant military intervention that the DC Empire has engaged in for decades. It is common knowledge that the US Military has its tentacles in every corner of the world, and that it is currently fighting dozens of wars that the politicians have no intention of ever winning. Further, the federal government uses hundreds of thousands of soldiers from state national guards to fight their wars. The DC politicians do this without even formally declaring war. Indeed, the federal interventionists have not officially declared war since 1942! In response to the ridiculous foreign interventionism, supporters of peace and liberty throughout the union have gotten behind ‘Defend The Guard’ legislation. House Bill 229 would prohibit the New Hampshire Guard from sending its soldiers to fight foreign wars unless the US Congress officially declares war. The House State-Federal Relations Committee is currently contemplating the HB229. The public hearing on this bill featured many legislators, citizens, and military veterans testifying in support of Defend The Guard. It can be watched from the 29 minute mark until the one hour and 52 minute mark in the video of the committee’s day of hearings.

Proposed by a strong libertarian legislator, House Bill 498 would require Fish & Game officers of the state to obtain a warrant before searches and seizures, just like all other law enforcement officers are required by law to do. The House Criminal Justice & Public Safety Committee will hold a public hearing on Friday Friday, January 27th at approximately 10:45 in the LOB room 206-208. Emails in support of HB498 will reach every member of the committee and could make them more likely to recommend the full House pass the bill.

After failing to gain enough support for a cannabis legalization bill that gave the government control of the industry last year, legislators have proposed legislation that could gain much broader support. House Bill 639 has 11 sponsors, including both Democrats and Republicans, including members of leadership, and including three Senators.

Many New Hampshire residents believe that driving is a natural right. Currently, it is a class B misdemeanor to drive without a valid non-expired license. Proposed by four Democrat lawmakers, House Bill 201 would reduce the first such offense to a violation. The House Criminal Justice & Public Safety Committee held a public hearing on 1/19 and will soon make a recommendation on the bill. Emails in support of HB201 will reach every member of the committee and could make them more likely to recommend the full House pass the bill.

All remote testimony can be viewed here.

The committees can be reached by email here: 

HouseCommerceCommittee@leg.state.nh.us

HouseCriminalJusticeandPublicSafety@leg.state.nh.us 

HouseJudiciaryCommittee@leg.state.nh.us 

HouseState-FederalRelationsandVeteransAffairs@leg.state.nh.us 

HouseJudiciaryCommittee@leg.state.nh.us

This article does not necessarily reflect the opinions of The Liberty Block or any of its members. We welcome all forms of serious feedback and debate. 


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